What Are RUMPS?

Today I’m writing to talk about something I have a secret love for, and those are called RUMPs. So what exactly does RUMP stand for?
A RUMP is a Reusable Menstrual Product.
Reusable Menstrual Products may seem like a weird concept to many people, but in fact they have been around for most of the time that we have as a human species. Disposable products such as pads and tampons were introduced in the late 1880s, but only became widely used and available around the 1920s.

So what counts as a RUMP?
Today, reusable products come in the form of menstrual cups and cloth pads. Anything that can be sanitized and reused can fall into this category.

Many people may think that reusing something for menstruation is gross, dirty, or even unsanitary. In reality, the exact opposite is true. Most people don’t realize that disposable products like pads and tampons are made in factories without any regulations as to what goes into them. That means that chemicals for bleaching, plastics, and scents are all allowed to be used when making them. Since disposable menstrual products aren’t considered a true medical product, they don’t have to go through Canadian regulations like the FDA. That means that you can be exposed to these chemicals as you use these products, many which have been linked to cancer and can cause skin irritation.
The current menstrual cup, the Diva Cup, on the other hand has gone through the rigorous FDA approval and is made of medical grade silicone; the same material used for many surgical implants.
Cloth pads come in a wide variety. Many people make their own, or there are companies both large and small that you can order from. You can even order pads made from organic materials and 100% cotton.
So what are the pros and cons to RUMPs?
Pros:
-You are helping reduce waste in the environment. By switching to a RUMPS, you can singlehandedly prevent up to 50 000 tampons and pads being thrown into garbage dumps over your lifetime. That’s probably one of the biggest waste reductions you can do with barely any effort.
– Saves you $$$ A menstrual cup can cost as little as $5 plus shipping if ordered online, to about $40 to buy the Diva cup at your local retailer. How long do they last? Some people can keep theirs anywhere from 4-10 years if cared for properly.
-Saves some space. You don’t have to get boxes of tampons or pads to hide in that ‘secret’ place or drawer anymore. A menstrual cup takes up no more room than a compact mirror in your purse, and chuck your cloth pads in with your underwear drawer until you need them again.
-Cloth pads are seriously cute, and super comfortable! Even if you have no intention of getting any, you should at least google them. Who doesn’t want to secretly have superwoman, unicorns, or mermaids on their pads?

Cons:
– If you’re grossed out by blood or your period, RUMPs may not be your best bet. They take a little extra planning ahead because you can’t just chuck and go, and require cleaning. Pads are easy enough to throw in the washing machine, but menstrual cups require you to be a bit more hands on.
– Cost a bit more. This one levels out, but the initial investment is higher to get a starter pack of cloth pads and/or a cup, which may deter some people at first. Just think long term!
– I honestly can’t think of any more!

I came to love RUMPs for several reasons. The first being, I can’t find anything else on the market that beats the effectiveness, is so leak proof, comfortable, and convenient as a menstrual cup. In my opinion it is hands down the Queen of mastering your menstrual cycle.
The second reason was that disposable products caused my skin to get irritated and I had more cramps using them. I thought I would never go back to pads and then tried cloth pads and loved those.
Would you try RUMPs?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s